In an Emergency Can I use a 48V Golf Cart to run my furnace

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beaverislander
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In an Emergency Can I use a 48V Golf Cart to run my furnace

Post by beaverislander » Thu Jul 23, 2020 11:25 am

Where I live we lose power often, generally in the middle of a winter storm when the weather is at it's worst. Can I somehow rig my 48V golf cart to run some electrical components in my house such as the circulator pumps and boiler on my heating system, 24v water well, and maybe a light bulb or two? It seems like the batteries were one of the more expensive components of any system and being that my 48v cart (with 6, 2 y/o 875's) is in storage all winter I got to wondering if it's possible to rig up the cart so I can move it from the garage to outside the utility room and run these items. Can it work, and are there plans available somewhere?
Thanks for any help.

raysun
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My RE system: Flexpower Two: (2) FXR3048A, (2) FM80, MATE3s, FlexNetDC
SimpliPhi 48-3.8 (6 @ 48v)
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Suniva 330 watt panels (12 - 6 strings of 2 in series)
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Re: In an Emergency Can I use a 48V Golf Cart to run my furnace

Post by raysun » Thu Jul 23, 2020 12:40 pm

:-#
beaverislander wrote:
Thu Jul 23, 2020 11:25 am
Where I live we lose power often, generally in the middle of a winter storm when the weather is at it's worst. Can I somehow rig my 48V golf cart to run some electrical components in my house such as the circulator pumps and boiler on my heating system, 24v water well, and maybe a light bulb or two? It seems like the batteries were one of the more expensive components of any system and being that my 48v cart (with 6, 2 y/o 875's) is in storage all winter I got to wondering if it's possible to rig up the cart so I can move it from the garage to outside the utility room and run these items. Can it work, and are there plans available somewhere?
Thanks for any help.
Are all the devices DC powered? How much power do they consume on a daily basis?

You have a 48V charger that's AC powered?

What is the model of the battery blocks?

beaverislander
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Re: In an Emergency Can I use a 48V Golf Cart to run my furnace

Post by beaverislander » Thu Jul 23, 2020 1:58 pm

The batteries are Trojan T-875's, and yes the charger is 48V, everything plugs into the 120 receptacles except for the well pump which I believe they set up for 240.

Label on furnace concrol says:
Rated Current 6A
Rated Power 5W
Zone valves say .71 and there are 4 of them.

When they put the furnace in they put a "pig tale" he called it in so I could plug it into an extension cord hooked to a generator.
Last edited by beaverislander on Thu Jul 23, 2020 2:04 pm, edited 1 time in total.

raysun
Forum Emperor
Posts: 2993
Joined: Tue Jul 26, 2016 5:57 am
My RE system: Flexpower Two: (2) FXR3048A, (2) FM80, MATE3s, FlexNetDC
SimpliPhi 48-3.8 (6 @ 48v)
Outback IBR3 battery enclosure
Suniva 330 watt panels (12 - 6 strings of 2 in series)
Hyundai 355 watt panels (6 - 3 strings of 2 in series)
Honda EU7000is gas fuel generator

Re: In an Emergency Can I use a 48V Golf Cart to run my furnace

Post by raysun » Thu Jul 23, 2020 2:03 pm

OK. I was questioning because the OP mentions a 24V well pump.

The battery is capable of roughly 4kWH power (85AH @ 48V) at 50% depth of discharge, so could be used for a certain amount of emergency backup power.

Since the devices are standard AC, the battery would feed an Inverter that would in turn power the critical loads. Most inverters are 120VAC, so would directly power most devices. The exception would be the 240V well pump. A somewhat pricier Inverter would be capable of outputting 240V, and could power all needed devices.

A transfer switch would be needed to disconnect the grid circuit when the Inverter is running so that power is not back-fed to the power company's lines.

Most folks will install a "critical loads" sub-panel off the house main power panel, plug all devices that must run during a power outage into it, and use the inverter's AC output to power it.

A 48V Inverter that would work very well in this service is the Outback Radian GS4048. It is a self-contained unit with 240V operation, built-in transfer switch, and also built in battery charger. It can accept AC input from the grid, or from a backup generator for extended outages.
Last edited by raysun on Thu Jul 23, 2020 2:23 pm, edited 1 time in total.

beaverislander
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Re: In an Emergency Can I use a 48V Golf Cart to run my furnace

Post by beaverislander » Thu Jul 23, 2020 2:07 pm

I meant to say 240V, and sorry but I don't know what it takes to run that. Also, I mentioned a couple standard light bulbs, they could even be 40 watt ones, just so we're not completely in the dark.

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